New (Disrupted) Faculty Roles

Rather than the Sage on the Stage or Guide on the Side, you’re going to see a growing embrace of the Sage on the Side model. The need for an instructor with high-quality, in-depth domain knowledge (The Sage) will never go away. But, in an age of ubiquitous information, he just doesn’t get a stage anymore. However, an age of ubiquitous information also means a lot of that information is going to be crap. An education Sherpa is needed to help students develop information literacy so they can sort the good from the bad.

The above quote comes from a Campus Technology (December 2011) report entitled What’s Hot, What’s Not 2012 http://campustechnology.com/Articles/2011/12/29/2012-Whats-Hot-Whats-Not.aspx?Page=1

As we at the Innovation Lab are looking at alternative models for T+L, we are enthused by initial conversations with Open Study and LOVE Philipp Schmidt and the guys at P2PU. That seems to make us threatening to some of our traditional faculty colleagues who see us as part of the conspiracy to replace them with robots, peer-to-peer non-experts or, to put it another way, to “SurowiekiTM” them out of existence.
We are hoping to work with Open Study on a research project as to how implementation of an alternative means of student support affects a classroom (online or face to face) community and the T+L experience.
Here’s what I think, or hope, or hope I think… It sort of builds on the above CT quote:

  • 80% of questions asked in an online class environment do not require a PhD to answer (that’s a near quote from Carol Twigg – hybrid teaching guru)
  • 80% of questions asked in a class were asked last year (Wayne Mackintosh – OERu guru)

Funny that they both landed on 80% – as the percentage of background, less-than-challenging questions that (perhaps) technology, or someone other than a Full Professor can help with.
Now if I were a FT professor, I could take this one of two ways – and I understand both perspectives:

  1. OH NO – My job is being taken away, how dare “they” how can computers and T.As or mentors replace me with my experience, passion and qualifications OR
  2. GREAT – now I don’t have to answer all those mind-numbingly dull, repetitive questions that I didn’t spend 5,6,7 years getting my PhD for – the ONLY time I will have to step up is when a question merits my expertise!

When answering only the 20%’s (the subject-matter-specific, *interesting* questions)– the faculty member who gets it can now oversee 5 x as many classes and will feel challenged and stretched in her/his discipline rather than in the basics that a computer, or a good generalist T.A / mentor could easily address. If this is built correctly, we enhance and honor the expertise of the expert and free them up to stay at their cutting edge of knowledge, rather than dealing with the “I uploaded the doc to Blackboard but it failed” / “I lost my password” / “my textbook hasn’t arrived yet”… etc.  That an FAQ (per: Wayne) or a “mentor” (per: Carol) covers for them.

One obvious flaw in this argument that could push faculty back to a fear and distrust would be if there weren’t 5 classes for them to oversee – and their load got cut. To that I would say that if we do embrace these new (disruptive) models then we have a shot at engaging the extra millions who need the education but can’t get access due to outdated models and non-scalable costs. No evolution / disaggregation of roles and I feel that traditional faculty roles will be threatened.  Better efficiencies, everyone playing to real strengths and I think we’ll get there.

“Sage on the side” / “Sherpa” – great terms – I wish I’d said that –  although as the saying goes:  Talent borrows, genius steals – so likely I will

Advertisements

One thought on “New (Disrupted) Faculty Roles

  1. Clarification of the Carol Twigg comment – I recall her stating 80% at a conference I attended in 2009, however her published work suggested it may be even higher that that:

    “The addition of a course assistant to address non-math-related questions (which constituted 90 percent of all interactions with students!) and to monitor students’ progress frees the instructor to concentrate on academic rather than logistical interactions with students.” in New Models for Online Learning – Educause Sept-Oct 2008

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s